Course Syllabus

FIRS YEAR

The course syllabus is the document that holds ALL of the policies and information you need for success in this class. 

You will need to read through the COMPLETE SYLLABUS before taking the Syllabus Quiz.

You are responsible for ALL of the information located in the syllabus. 

 

Puma Resources for Students (a link on the lefthand side of the page) is an excellent resource to familiarize yourself with. There are resources listed for both academic and personal wellness or help. 

Weekly Learning Objectives and Details Weekly Assignments

Week One:

Your goal for the first week is to get acquainted with the course and the expectations for the semester. You will want to start by reading through the entire homepage, the syllabus, and looking through the different notes and pages available to you as resources.

You will need to take a syllabus acknowledgment quiz after you read through the syllabus.

Additionally, we will start the semester by setting goals and we will reflect on these goals throughout our experiences. 

You will watch Dr. Ibram X. Kendi's brief video: How to Be the Smartest Person in the Room

You will then respond to the questions posed in the assignment.

This semester, we will work hard towards focusing on understanding our own place, purpose, and motivation for our success in this course and beyond. The video and questions associated help us to start thinking about that. 

  1. Due Thursday: Syllabus Acknowledgement Quiz
  2. Due Thursday: Week One: Dr. Kendi's Video
    1. How to Upload and Submit an Assignment NOT Using the Textbox:

Week Two:

This week is dedicated to understanding the essential skills associated with critical thinking and critical reading that will be the foundation for our success when writing a college-level academic argument. 

How to Read and Annotate a Text

Close Reading and Textual Analysis

Through the two assignments, we will break down the steps for how to critically read a text and take notes that will help benefit us later. Additionally, we will learn how to then think about these texts in a critical and engaging way that allows for interesting questions. Learning how to think about texts provides us with the information and ideas we need to then write about texts.

You will need to read Stephen Pinker's "In Defense of Dangerous Ideas" and Teju Cole's "Black Body" in order to complete these assignments. 

I encourage you to enroll in FreeWrite on Canvas as it will be a very useful tool for you.

  1. Due Monday: How to Read and Annotate a Text 
  2. Due Thursday: How to Close Read and Analyze a Text   

Week Three:

This week we continue to learn the foundational basics of academic writing. Citing sources and providing proper formatting and documentation is key to creating a professional and academic paper. In English, we use MLA format as our formatting guide. There are other formatting styles depending on the field you are in. 

We will focus on learning the basics of MLA format including how to create in-text citations. Please read through the following information before taking the MLA quiz.

MLA Formatting

Purdue OWL MLA Formatting Guide

MLA Quick Guide to In-text Citations

Additionally, we will start to learn the essential parts of an academic essay.

This week's task will focus on learning about Thesis statements and what the purpose of a thesis statement is. How to Craft a Thesis Statement

We will read the short story, "Popsy" by Stephen King and use the story as the basis for our practice writing during the next week. 

  1. Due Monday: 
    1. Annotations for "Popsy"
    2. MLA Quiz
  2. Due Thursday: Thesis Statements based on "Popsy" by Stephen King
  3. How to View Instructor Feedback to Help Revise Your Work: 

Week Four:

This week we finish working on our foundational skills before we jump into writing our first real essay of the semester. We will focus on how to write an introduction and body paragraph for an academic argument. You will incorporate your thesis statement from last week into this week's work. The goal is to better understand what an introduction requires and how to format a body paragraph focused on analysis and critical thinking. 

How to Write an Introduction

How to Write a Body Paragraph

This week we will put into practice the foundational skills that we've been working to develop over the past few weeks and begin the process of preparing for our first major essay, The Literary Analysis. 

The Literary Analysis essay will be a close reading analysis based on a short story. You will have two stories to choose from but to be fully prepared, you will read and think critically and deeply about both before making a selection for the argument. 

We will start with one short story this week: "The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gilman

  1. Due Monday: Introductory Paragraph and Body Paragraph over "Popsy" 
  2. Due Thursday: Annotations for "The Yellow Wallpaper"  

 

Week Five: 

The Literary Analysis essay will be a close reading analysis based on a short story. You will have two stories to choose from but to be fully prepared, you will read and think critically and deeply about both before making a selection for the argument.

The Literary Analysis Essay

This week we will read the second story option for our essay and start developing a topic and rough thesis statement--the argument--for our first essay. 

"Bloodchild" by Octavia Butler

  1. Due TUESDAY: Annotations for "Bloodchild" 
  2. Due Thursday: Topic Proposal and Thesis Statement for Literary Analysis Essay 

 

Week Six:

Now that you have developed your idea and a rough thesis statement for your first essay, this week is dedicated to WRITING and DRAFTING the essay. Writing an essay is a process, and as such, we are breaking down the process step by step. We've developed an idea and an argument, and now we need to expand that into a full essay. 

Literary Analysis Resource Page

"The Yellow Wallpaper" 

"Bloodchild" 

Don't forget to review MLA format as you write your first essay. 

MLA Formatting

MLA Quick Guide to In-Text Citations

 

  1. NO WORK DUE THIS WEEK 

Week Seven:

This week we are working on combining the skills we've developed and we will put them into practice in our first official writing project. You will be demonstrating how you can close read and analyze a text, determining what evidence is worth inclusion as support, explaining and analyzing how the evidence supports your argument and pulling it all together in a complete and cohesive essay. 

How to Access Peer Review Links in Canvas

The second half of the week is dedicated to our first peer review. Peer review often creates a level of anxiety, and although understandable, I want to remind all of you how qualified you are and that the goal of peer review is to make us all better writers. No one is going to be rude or mean because the goal of peer review is to highlight places we can improve, and our writing can always improve, no matter what. You are qualified to provide suggestions because you are part of the audience and if you struggle to understand the argument, you will want to identify those places for the writer. 

  1. Due Monday: Complete Draft-Literary Analysis Essay
  2. Due Thursday: Peer Reviews:
    1. Please going into the original draft assignment using a browser, not the app, to find the links to your peers' papers that you've been assigned to review. 
    2. The peer review directions are also located in the original draft assignment 

Week Eight:

This week we are practicing revision with the Literary Analysis Essay as you prepare your final submission. You will have received feedback from your peers. Revision is essential to developing the tools needed for success in academic writing. Peer Review is not intended to hurt feelings, but rather reveal ways that we, as writers, can continue to get better. There is always room for improvement. No paper will ever be perfect.

Visit the LSC (virtually) for help revising! 

Once you submit your Final Literary Analysis Essay, you will complete a reflection assignment. Reflective writing is a key component to success. It provides us with the ability to think back on what we did, what we didn't do, what worked, what could have been done differently, and by taking the time to actually think about those things, we better prepare ourselves for our future work. 

The reflection assignment also gives us an opportunity to check in on the goals we set at the beginning of the semester and monitor our progress, while also setting new goals to achieve. 

  1. Due Monday: Final Literary Analysis Essay 
  2. Due Thursday: Reflection over Literary Analysis Essay

Week Nine: 

SPRING BREAK 

 

No work due this week - Spring Break! 

Week Ten:

This week we will build on our skills by moving into our next writing assignment: The Scholarly Research Assignment. 

Go to The Scholarly Research Assignment and Resource page for details about the upcoming assignment. Part of this assignment is working on developing a new academic writing skill: summary. Additionally, you will be asked to join in the critical scholarly conversation around a story and argument.

First, you will read "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin

Then, you will read "Fatal Self-Assertion in Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour"" by Lawerence Berkove

The story and the critical argument about the story will be the foundation for our next major assignment:

The Scholarly Research Assignment

  1. Due Monday: Annotations for "The Story of an Hour" 
  2. Due Thursday: Annotations for "Fatal Self-Assertion in Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour"" 

Week Eleven: 

This week we will begin working on a new skill: Summary Writing. You have already started to prepare for this skill by discussing the main point and pulling out quotes from the article: "Fatal Self-Assertion of Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour"". 

This week will help prepare us for using scholarly arguments as lenses and support for our own future arguments. Additionally, we are working this week on developing our understanding of academic argument and how to read and integrate research and scholarly arguments into our work. Summarizing, paraphrasing, and using direct quotes in our work is a key competency that we will continue to practice this week. 

Start by reviewing How to Write a Summary Paragraph

Then, you will draft a 250-word minimum summary of "Fatal Self-Assertion in Kate Chopin's "Story of an Hour"". 

After your initial draft, you will be asked to review the detailed rubric, revise your draft, and reflect on the changes you made to enhance the success of your summary. 

This summary will be the first part of your Scholarly Research Assignment

  1. Due Monday: Draft of Summary Paragraph (min 250 words)
  2. Due Thursday: Summary Paragraph Revision with Rubric and Reflection 

Week Twelve:

This week you will combine the skills we developed early on that focused on direct analysis of a text and combine it with your summary writing to create a complete Scholarly Research Assignment. We are continuing to work on learning how scholarly research and texts are the heart of the academic argument. Critical discourse is an academic conversation that exists around what people argue about different topics. 

Visit the Scholarly Research Assignment page to revisit the directions for the full assignment and don't forget to read the sample essay. It will be an additional resource to aid you in success. 

You will want to watch the revision video, complete the revision checklist, and review the rubric as you revise your essay to prepare for submission. 

  1. Due Monday: Full Draft of the Scholarly Research Assignment
  2. Thursday: Work on revising your Scholarly Research Assignment 

Week Thirteen:

This week we will work on making final revisions to the Scholarly Research Assignment and continue to develop our reflective writing skills.

Reflective writing is a key component to success. It provides us with the ability to think back on what we did, what we didn't do, what worked, what could have been done differently, and by taking the time to actually think about those things, we better prepare ourselves for our future work. 

The reflection assignment also gives us an opportunity to check in on the goals we set at the beginning of the semester and after our first paper; we have the opportunity to monitor our progress, while also setting new goals to achieve as we begin to close out our work this semester. 

Revisit your initial goal-setting work and your reflection after the Literary Analysis Essay before moving forward with this reflection.

  1. Due Monday: Final Scholarly Research Assignment
  2. Due Thursday: Reflection over Scholarly Research Assignment

Week Fourteen:

This week, we begin our final writing assignments where we pull together the skills we've developed throughout the course to analyze two different pieces of pop culture.

Visit the Pop Culture Analysis page to learn more about our work this week. 

First, this week we will engage with an academic argument about the role of Disney films in culture. We will work to identify the main argument of the article and pull out key quotes that help to establish the argument.

The article we are using is "Whistle While You Work? Disney Animation, Organizational Readiness, and Gendered Subjugation" by Griffen et al

Due Monday: Annotations for "Whistle While You Work? Disney Animation, Organizational Readiness, and Gendered Subjugation" 

Due Thursday: Summary Paragraph for "Whistle While You Work?..." 

Week Fifteen: 

This week we will continue to synthesize our skills as we learn to use the argument, "Whistle While You Work?..." as a lens to view pop culture today. We will want to determine whether or not the arguments the authors made stand up in different pieces of pop culture. 

Visit the Pop Culture Analysis for a video description and examples.

  1. Due Monday: UP! Analysis Paragraph using "Whistle While You Work?..."

Week Sixteen:

This week we will work on your final writing assignment. Your final writing assignment for the course is the Critical Course Reflection where you will reflect on your writing throughout the course. You will discuss how you've achieved the numerous competencies designed for English 101, how you've developed critical thinking skills through the work we've accomplished, and how you've worked to achieve the goals you set throughout the course. 

Reflect back on your goal-setting and reflections from the semester to aid you in completion of this paper:

Dr. Kendi Goal Setting

Reflection after Literary Analysis Essay

Reflection after Scholarly Research Assignment 

 

Congratulations! You've Completed English 101! 

  1. Due Monday: Pop Culture Analysis Response with "Whistle While You Work..." 
  2. Due Thursday: Critical Course Reflection 

 

Course Summary:

Date Details Due